Tag: mineral estate

28Jun
The Texas Supreme Court Decides Whether “Subject To” Clause Alters Who Must Bear NPRI Burden

The Texas Supreme Court Decides Whether “Subject To” Clause Alters Who Must Bear NPRI Burden

In a decision that focuses on the parties’ intent as expressed within the four corners of the document, the Texas Supreme Court in Wenske v. Ealy [1]13-15-00012-CV, ___ S.W.3d ___ (Tex. 2017) decided whether the language of a deed puts the entire burden of an outstanding non-participating royalty interest (“NPRI”) on the grantees or whether the NPRI proportionately burdens both the grantor’s reserved interest and the interest conveyed to the grantees.  The grantors argued that their reserved interest is not burdened by the NPRI, while the grantees argued that the NPRI proportionately burdens both their interest and the grantors’ interest.  The Court ruled that, based on the language in the deed, the NPRI proportionately burdens both the conveyed and reserved interest.

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25Oct
Mystery Solved! 100+ Year Old Instrument Ruled to be a Mineral Deed

100+ Year-Old Title Dispute: Instrument Ruled a Mineral Deed, Not a Lease

Think your early chain of title has been cured by the passage of time?  As this recent case shows, even 100+ year-old instruments can be the subject of new disputes. The Tyler Court of Appeals, in Richardson v. Mills [1] Richardson v. Mills, 12-15-00170-CV, 2016 WL 5800261 (Tex. App.—Tyler Oct. 5, 2016, no. pet. h.)   recently reviewed whether a 100+ year-old instrument was a lease or a mineral deed, and the effect of a release entered approximately two years later.

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© Copyright 2012-2018, McGinnis Lochridge LLP. All Rights Reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information in this article is for general information purposes only. This article should not be substituted for legal advice and should not be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or reading this article does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. You are encouraged to contact an attorney for legal advice concerning the information provided in this article.
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