About Oil and Gas Law Digest

 

Oil and Gas Law Digest, founded by McGinnis Lochridge attorneys in 2012, has grown by leaps and bounds to become a true home for in-house attorneys and landmen to find valuable updates and insights on legal issues pertaining to the oil and gas industry.  By pairing oil and gas law with the power and reach of the internet, Oil and Gas Law Digest has found a wide audience ranging from young professionals to established decision-makers. OilandGasLawDigest.com seeks to provide immense value and insight on a broad scope of topics within oil and gas law.

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Oil and Gas Law Digest features content written by attorneys of the law firm McGinnis Lochridge, as well as occasional special guests. OilandGasLawDigest.com seeks to provide immense value and insight on a broad scope of topics within oil and gas law.

Recent Print citations to OilandGasLawDigest.com include:

  • United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs – Financing for Development, “Note on Capital Gains Taxation and Taxation of Indirect Asset Transfers,” 2015, http://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/11STM_Attachment2_Cgt.pdf.
  • Michael P. Vargo, Why the Accommodation Doctrine Should Not Apply to Groundwater Owners Under Coyote Lake Ranch, LLC v. City of Lubbock, 6 HLRe 167 (2016)
  • Barry Barnett and Laura Abrahamson, The Hottest Oil & Gas Claims for 2015 – and How to Beat Them, 2015 Institute for Energy Law.
  • Cressinda Schlag, Indemnity for Environmental Damage: Methods for Structuring an Enforceable Indemnification Agreement for Environmental Claims and Liability, Energy & Mineral Law Foundation 36th Annual Institute, 2015.

Related McGinnis Lochridge Practice Areas

Editors:

Austin Brister
Austin assists clients in all aspects of mergers, acquisitions and divestitures of energy properties, from the first letter of intent through negotiations, closing and post-closing matters. He has assisted clients in a variety of deals including farmouts, purchase and sale transactions, joint exploration and development agreements, participation agreements, and more routine operational transactions such as joint operating agreements and master services agreements.
Austin Brister
Chris Halgren
Chris represents clients in a wide variety of litigation matters. Chris strives to identify an aggressive, yet practical approach to accomplish his clients' needs, taking into account the particular legal and business issues presented. With horizontal drilling transforming the energy landscape across Texas, Chris developed an emphasis on oil and gas related matters. He has represented operators, non-operators, and landowners in a variety of disputes ranging from seismic misappropriation, leasing issues, royalty disputes, title litigation, lease termination, midstream accounting, and other related contractual disputes. Chris has been selected to the Texas Super Lawyers Rising Stars list, a Thomson Reuters service, (2014-2015).
Chris Halgren

Accolades

Austin, I have found several of your articles to be very well written and informative! Especially helpful regarding the complexities, concepts and pitfalls involved in land.

The ‘Thank You’ is all mine! … what a marvelous contribution to the profession. Well done.

Neil M. Sullivan
Neil M. Sullivan
Former VP of Anadarko and Valero, current COO of Sharpe Energy

From LinkedIn: I have been personally examining title for 33 years and it does not take me long to recognize a very good title attorney. Although I did not work directly with Austin at Sadler Law from our first contact I recognized that his legal ability was top notch. I would recommend him to anyone who is looking for a very good title attorney.

John J. Clennan
John J. Clennan
Partner, Clennan & Hood, PLLC

Austin and I have worked together for many years in numerous capacities. His legal acumen and ability to produce high quality, focused legal analysis without sacrificing efficiency is unparalleled. You should be at ease trusting Austin with any title examination, due diligence, or acquisition work you may need, regardless of its complexity or urgency. He is also incredibly outgoing and excellent at explaining complex legal issues in a way that is clear and easy to comprehend. I wholeheartedly recommend Austin.

Devon Stiles
Devon Stiles
Landman/Attorney, Okie Energy, LLC; formerly with Chesapeake Energy

I think you have a talent for writing very informatively in a way that is comprehensive, short, and easy to read. You are not assuming your entire audience is attorneys, using too much legal jargon. Instead, people from all walks of life can walk away understanding the concepts.

Heath Lovell
Heath Lovell
Registered Professional Landman

Saw you yesterday at PALTA and really enjoyed your down to earth approach-best I’ve heard from an attorney!

Cody Crossland
Cody Crossland
CrownQuest

Austin displays a level of enthusiasm for this industry which is unmatched by his peers. He has an outstanding work ethic and a deep understanding of the multiple areas that oil and gas law can entail. He also has shown a deep desire to satisfy his clients needs. I am happy to give Austin my endorsement and would recommend him to any potential client that is considering him.

Matthew Schreiner
Matthew Schreiner
Attorney at A.M. Hunter III & Associates

The Oil and Gas Law Digest is quickly becoming a must-read for anyone interested in relevant, quality oil and gas content.

Roger Gingell
Roger Gingell
COO of EnergyFunders.com, In-House Landman, Attorney

Austin and I worked on several projects together at a firm we were previously with. He is one of the hardest working and brightest young attorneys in the workforce right now. Austin has displayed an exceptional ability to conduct legal research and produce an excellent written product. Austin is a team player and very easy to work with. He is willing to be a leader or a role player in any given group situation. I have known Austin since our days in law school and I recommend him on a personal level just as much as I do on a professional level. He has a great legal mind and is a dedicated attorney.

Scott Kearney
Scott Kearney
Member, Attorney at Bibby, McWilliams & Kearney, PLLC

 

  • Nanci Giblin

    I need a crash coarse on DOIs

    • Austin W. Brister

      Hi Nanci!

      What can I help you with specifically? The breakdown of the various interests? How they are expressed? What interests burden what? How to calculate the various interests?f

  • Dan

    Hey Austin, good work on the site. I have a question regarding pooling. Let’s say you have a 640 acre section in which the minerals are owned by farmer A. He leases the N/2 to company B, and leases the S/2 to company C using the same form and rates. B and C then assigned their leases to company D. If D wants to drill in the middle of the section (thus creating a pro ration unit covering both the N/2 and S/2), do they have to designate a pooled unit and thus pool the N/2 and S/2? Or is this unnecessary because the ownership is uniform? Thank you!

    • Austin W. Brister

      In Texas, I am about 99.9% certain you will not see a pooled unit in this fact-pattern. Instead, these are called “Lease Wells” and we never see a Designation of Unit for these. This can cause a problem sometimes when looking at a classic Pugh clause which causes lease termination for all lands not included in a “Pooled Unit.” Instead, these pugh clauses will sometimes specify that the lease will terminate as to any lands not included within a proration unit. However, this also causes a problem, because now you have a unit that is allocating based on some sort of acreage that may different when compared to the acreage that is released. THere are a few other problems you can run into with these “Proration Pughs,” but I suppose all of this is a little outside the scope of your question.

    • In Texas, you really won’t see your typical pooled unit in this fact-pattern. Instead, these are typically called “Lease Wells” and you probably won’t see your typical Designation of Unit for these. This can cause a problem sometimes when looking at a classic Pugh clause which historically causes partial lease termination for all lands not included in a “Pooled Unit.” There are a whole bunch of problems you can get into with these, and you really have to be careful to draft things very very literally and carefully. This would probably be a great idea for an article!

© Copyright 2014, Austin W. Brister. All Rights Reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information in this article is for general information purposes only. This article should not be substituted for legal advice and should not be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or reading this article does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. You are encouraged to contact an attorney for legal advice concerning the information provided in this article.
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We keep clients and subscribers updated on case law alerts and insightful articles. Join more than 2,000+ in-house attorneys and landmen who receive our occasional alerts and summaries. All for free!
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We keep clients and subscribers updated on case law alerts and insightful articles. Join more than 2,000+ in-house attorneys and landmen who receive our occasional alerts and summaries. All for free!